S1 E6 Court Larabee – A Holistic Approach

Court Larabee is the Founder and Executive Director of the Indigenous Life Sport Academy (ISLA), the Indigenous Relations Specialist for Whistler Blackcomb, and a multisport athlete. We had the opportunity to sit down with Court to discuss his work, holistic approaches to sport, developing young leaders, and authentic partnerships.

The show is available everywhere you get podcasts December 17 , 2021.

LINKS

TRANSCRIPT

Show transcripts are autogenerated and available here:

https://share.descript.com/embed/kcgoxddgLWN

S1 E5 Henri Rivers – There’s Only One Question

Henri Rivers is the 16th and current President of the National Brotherhood of Skiers. The largest and oldest Black ski organization in the world, with over 3500 members and a 50th anniversary coming up in 2023. We had the opportunity to sit down with Henri to discuss the organizations success, the changing demographics in Canada in the US, and the one question organizations need to ask themselves about inclusivity.

The show is available everywhere you get podcasts December 10, 2021.

LINKS

TRANSCRIPT

Show transcripts are autogenerated and available here:

https://share.descript.com/embed/Mji2zltoI4q

S1 E4 Sandy Ward – Holding Space for Women

Sandy Ward is a professional snowboarder, the back country team lead at Indigenous Women Outdoors , and a professional coach and instructor. We had the opportunity to sit down with Sandy to discuss her coaching philosophy, the importance of creating women centered spaces, and developing women leaders in outdoor spaces.

The show is available everywhere you get podcasts December 3, 2021.

Don’t forget to check out the ‘Our Fabric’ documentary series

LINKS

MORE TO SEE

TRANSCRIPT

Show transcripts are autogenerated and available here:

https://share.descript.com/embed/lgm6sq2PpKU

S1 E3 Aaron Marchant – Dreaming Big

Aaron Marchant is the Founder and President of the First Nations Snowboard Team. We had the opportunity to sit down with Aaron to discuss the dream of the First Nations Snowboard Team, the work to make that dream a reality, and how it’s grown and evolved over the last 20 years.

The show is available everywhere you get podcasts November 26, 2021.

LINKS

TRANSCRIPT

Show transcripts are autogenerated and available here:

https://share.descript.com/embed/0n0zwyT4oyp

S1 E2 Latasha Dunston – A Fresh Perspective

Latasha Dunston is an artist, designer muralist, and an Ambassador with Coalition Snow. We had the opportunity to sit down with Latasha to discuss her work, her introduction to snowboarding, being unapologetically yourself in the outdoors, and some great advice for folks new to the sports.

The show is available everywhere you get podcasts November 19, 2021.

Don’t forget to check out Latasha’s incredible artwork including the Coalition Snow ‘Queen B’ Snowboard.

LINKS

TRANSCRIPT

Show transcripts are autogenerated and available here:

https://share.descript.com/embed/ImkxJwpbEZl

S1 E1 Connor Ryan – Good Relations

Connor Ryan is a professional skier, Natives Outdoors Athlete, and Protect Our Winters Advocate. We had the opportunity to sit down with Connor to discuss his work and upcoming projects, skiing with reciprocity, and being in good relation.

The show is available everywhere you get podcasts November 12, 2021.

Don’t forget to check out Connor’s directorial debut in the new film ‘Spirit of the Peaks’

LINKS

MORE TO SEE

TRANSCRIPT

Show transcripts are autogenerated and available here:

https://share.descript.com/embed/wOwz9NfzCJP

This is Not a Pain Podcast

BIPoC Outside is a podcast about joy, empowerment, and the transformative power of the outdoors. We’re going to talk to athletes who are crushing it at all levels, innovators who are pushing the sports forward in terms of how, where, and what gear we use to do them, and organizers who are breaking down barriers so everyone can participate. Our first season, On the Snow, will drop November 2021. We hope you’ll join us.

First things First… BIPoC???

What Does it Stand For?

Black, Indigenous, and Peoples of Colour

It is also styled as IBPoC. Both are correct and are equal in every way except one… the ease of saying it out loud.

Where Did it Come From?

BIPoC, like a lot of things, emerged on social media.

In 2013 folks were looking for a more accessible term for racialized peoples. Terms like ‘racial minorities’, ‘visible minorities’, ‘people of colour’, or ‘non-white’ had mostly fallen out of favour because they implied that race is biological. The term racialized peoples recognizes that race is a social construct but being assigned race can have very real impacts on an individual. Is the term an improvement on its predecessors, yes. Is it a bit unwieldly for a social media generation, also yes.

So… BIPoC

How is it Used Properly?

First: Individuals are not BIPoC

Unless they specifically choose to identify as BIPoC. Normalize asking folks if you’re not sure, like asking for someone’s pronouns, it’s just respectful.

BIPoC is an umbrella terms for racialized peoples, which brings us to

Second: Different communities or individuals who fall under this umbrella term have different identities and experiences based on their culture, politics, faith, region they grew up in, and an unlimited number of other factors. Grouping them all together under this term doesn’t mean these individual perspectives become any less important.

Third: BIPoC is an imperfect term. Like many things created to fit within limited character text spaces it lacks nuance. To maintain the spirit of inclusiveness of this term it’s important to be mindful of capitalization, where you place the ‘and’, and most critically, that ‘Peoples’ is pluralized.

To find the nuance, BIPoC Outside will be speaking with Black, Indigenous, and Peoples of Colour, and BIPoC communities to explore BIPoC experiences doing awesome things outdoors.

Lesson over, lets get to the fun stuff!